Programming the STM32F4 DISCOVERY with the Bus Blaster

STM32F4 DISCOVERY (left)             Bus Blaster 2.0a1 (right)

In my last post I talked about how to set up a toolchain on OSX. In this post I will show you how to program and debug the Discovery board using open source hardware and software.

The Discovery board supports ARM's new two wire SWD serial debug port and 6 wire JTAG port. ST provides programmers and software to program their chip, but as usual no Linux support. Their dev boards also include a USB to JTAG translator called ST-LINK which has Linux support thanks to texane over at github. There has been discussion there about adding support for the STM32F4 and it appears one fork has been made for this purpose. At this point support seems spotty and programming takes longer than it should so I'll show you the alternative.

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Using the STM32F4 DISCOVERY Board in OSX Lion


Update: Check out the new post on programming with JTAG


I recently got the STM32F4DISCOVERY board, which features ARM's new CortexM4 with 1 MB Flash and 192 KB RAM. For the past couple of years I've been using AVRs because you can get open source compilers, libraries and programmers unlike their competitors. The only thing I miss from the ARM world is processor speed. Most of Atmel's low end chips are less than 100MHz and can cost as much as a 150MHz ARM cpu with similar peripherals. This is one of the reasons why I am switching to ARM for the next prototype of the bicycle computer. Maybe I'll stay in the family and use Atmel's new CortexM4 when it comes out.

To use the STM32F4 Discovery in OSX we are going to need a cross compiler. There is a great thread on dangerousprototypes with lots of info, which I will summarize here. Then I'll show the alternative setup.

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